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The Unfindable Objects Inquiry

Living Realization is a nondual text and method by Scott Kiloby.

The text is built upon Scott’s direct experience and is influenced by a variety of teachings including Madyamaka Buddhism, Advaita Vedanta, Dzogchen, and Integral Theory. It is also based on the Middle Way, which is freedom from dualistic extremes.

Scott began writing LR in 2008. Through the years, Scott has revised the text, responding to issues that have popped up in his own spiritual journey as well as in one-on-one and group meetings with others.

 

Scott has included an interesting inquiry in the revised LR text. The inquiry is called Unfindable” Inquiry.  Scott developed the inquiry after meeting with people who were experiencing freedom or recognizing presence but still believing in separation in one form or another. In meeting with people over the years, he noticed a tendency to equate recognizing consciousness as “freedom from concepts” or even “turning away from concepts” or the “world.” Turning away from anything assumes it has a separate nature. It assumes that what appears to awareness is separate from awareness. It assumes that there are separate objects.

The Unfindable Inquiry does something unusual in nonduality.

  • Scott invites people to get a clear picture of how they believe something exists separately (e.g., self, other, the world, thought, illness, or injustice).
  • He then invites them to “go actively into” this thing, to look for its separateness.
  • In not finding a separate object, there is a natural relaxation into inseparability [nonduality] that happens.
  • Instead of turning away from things, people are invited to look directly at what they believe is a separate thing and penetrate deeply into it, finding no separate object there at all.

 

Living Realization is known for its simplicity.

 

“The basic invitation invites us to recognize awareness, let all appearances be as they are, and see that all appearances are inseparable. We don’t have to do anything except notice that this is always our experience. We’ve just been overlooking it, in favor of a belief in separation. The majority of the text is directed at inviting us to relax, over and over, into this simple yet powerful seeing until it becomes directly obvious in our own experience. In “letting appearances” be as they are, we are not manipulating anything that arises.”

“Another, unique aspect of LR is the depth into which the method looks into whether objects are separate. There are inquiries in the book that invite us to take a more active look into the nature of separation. These inquiries invite us to notice when we are experiencing separate objects and then actively inquiry into what thoughts, emotions, and sensations make up the object. In looking for the separate object but only finding individual arisings such as thoughts, emotions, and sensation, we see through the belief in separation—through the belief that there is a separate object there at all.”

“I invite those participating in Living Realization to attend the meetings or speak to me one-on-one in Private Sessions. In these sessions, I will take you through the entire Unfindable Inquiry in a way that is relevant to the content of your life. This inquiry, once you get a feel for it, is like a sharp knife cutting through the ignorance of separation no matter how it appears for you.”

 

Oscillation

The text discusses oscillation, which is the sense of “I’ve got it, now I’ve lost it.”  It is the experience of going back and forth between moments of recognizing awareness and then being drawn back into the suffering, seeking, or conflict of separation.

The book explains that oscillation occurs precisely because there is still a belief in separate objects operating. The object could be the self center (“ego”). It could be the sense of a separate other in a relationship. It could be any other object such as death, bankruptcy, or a job, even though we might not realize at first that we experience those as separate things. The point is that separation is the root of all suffering, seeking, and conflict.

“In recognizing awareness, people get a sense that their basic identity is this awareness in which all objects out there in the world come and go—as if there is an inherent “in here” v. an inherent “out there.”  The “in here” can seem like a formless awareness while the “out there” looks like a bunch of separate forms.  It is possible to realize that awareness and the world are inseparable.  In Living Realization, we come to see that there are no separate objects. We see that there is no inherent “silent witness” or awareness apart from what is appearing.  Life is seamless experiencing in every way.  When we are experiencing separate objects, the Unfindable Inquiries are tools that we use to actively look for these objects. We don’t find them anywhere.  All divisions are seen through.”

 

*According to Scott, this inquiry has been very effective in one-on-one sessions as it helps people see through suffering, seeking, and conflict, all of which is based in separation.

Scott invites you to see for yourself how effective these inquiries are.

Living Realization website

The Unfindable Inquiry Video 

*Digital [bird] art by Ernie Resendes for Eleven-Eleven Studios.

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Scott Kiloby has included an interesting inquiry in his new and revised Living Realization text.  The inquiry is called “Unfindable Objects.”  Scott developed the Unfindable Objects inquiry after meeting with people who were experiencing freedom or recognizing presence but still believing in separation in one form or another.  In meeting with people over the years, he noticed a tendency to equate recognizing consciousness as “freedom from concepts” or even “turning away from concepts” or the “world.”  Turning away from anything assumes it has a separate nature.  It assumes that what appears to awareness is separate from awareness.  It assumes that there are separate objects.  The Unfindable Objects inquiry does something unusual in nonduality.  In this inquiry, Scott invites people to get a clear picture of how they believe something exists separately (e.g., self, other, the world, thought, illness, or injustice).  He then invites them to “go actively into” this thing, to look for its separateness.  In not finding a separate object, there is a natural relaxation into inseparability (i.e. nonduality)  that happens.  Instead of turning away from things. People are invited to look directly at what they believe is a separate thing and penetrate deeply into it, finding no separate object there at all.  Scott’s inquiry has been very successful in one-on-one chats.  He is now bringing it to a wider audience, hoping to help people see through suffering, seeking, and conflict, all of which is based in separation.

2 responses

  1. “The text is built upon Scott’s direct experience and is influenced by a variety of teachings including Madyamaka Buddhism, Advaita Vedanta, Dzogchen, and Integral Theory. It is also based on the Middle Way, which is freedom from dualistic extremes.”

    This is exactly why I find Scott to be one of the most interesting contemporary spiritual teachers around. The way in which he nowadays is able to dynamically morph into various roles and “teaching-modes”, depending on contextual requirements, is both rare and praiseworthy!

    I remember when I stumbled upon Scott for the first time like two years ago, when, surfing around on Youtube, I found one of his videos called: “Your Spiritual Teacher Is Full of Crap”! Needless to say, I knew right then that this was a person worth keeping an eye on. So instant subscribe-click.

    January 27, 2011 at 1:27 pm

  2. Kevin

    Marvelous post!

    February 2, 2011 at 5:32 pm

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